Opened
Location
Track Length
Friday | Free Practice 1
Friday | Free Practice 2
Saturday | Qualifying
Saturday | Race

Podium

1
19
Marta Garcia
Points
25
2
95
Beitske Visser
Points
18
3
55
Jamie Chadwick
Points
15

The Weekend at Norisring

Maiden W Series victory for Marta Garcia at Norisring 

Eighteen-year-old Marta Garcia (ESP) was crowned champion of the fourth W Series race at the iconic Norisring near Nuremberg (Bavaria) this afternoon, 3.619sec ahead of Beitske Visser (NDL), who finished P2 for the second race in a row. Bagging pole position in qualifying and clocking the second-fastest lap of the race (51.049sec), the Spanish teenager drove superbly to earn 25 points, elevating herself to third position in the title chase.

Beitske made a stunning start, climbing from P5 to P2 by Turn One, forcing championship leader Jamie Chadwick (GBR) into third place. That formation (Garcia-Visser-Chadwick) endured for the duration of the race, Jamie putting intense pressure on Beitske at the end. However, it was Beitske who came out on top, finishing just under half a second ahead of her main championship rival.

In fourth position was Fabienne Wohlwend (LIE) who, after another strong drive, finished 2.135sec behind Jamie. But hot on her heels was Emma Kimilainen (FIN), who made an outstanding comeback after being forced to miss the past two races through injury. Qualifying in P8, Emma fought her way through the field, gaining three places and ultimately finishing in P5, clocking the fastest lap of the race on her way.

Sadly, it was a race weekend to forget for Alice Powell (GBR) who, after being T-boned during FP1 yesterday, was forced to start today’s race from P18 following a gearbox problem during qualifying. They say that bad luck comes in threes and that was certainly the case for Alice who, despite putting in an extraordinary race drive, climbing from P18 to P8, had to retire early for the third time this weekend, blighted by a fuel pump issue with less than five minutes to go.

Falling victim to the challenge of the notorious Turn One was Sarah Moore (GBR), who collided with Shea Holbrook (USA), causing damage to the front of her car. Although she managed to get going again, her suspension eventually gave way, causing her to pull over and retire.

Completing a sad trio of British DNFs was Jessica Hawkins (GBR) who, despite qualifying and therefore starting from P6, a position she retained for almost the entirety of the race, suffered a terminal power loss minutes before the end, which caused a premature finish to what had been a very impressive weekend for the 24-year-old from Hampshire.

Race Day Videos

Race Highlights

Qualifying

Position No. Driver Nationality Laps Best Time
1 19 Marta Garcia Spanish 27 50.712
2 55 Jamie Chadwick British 26 50.793
3 5 Fabienne Wohlwend Liechtenstein 26 50.921
4 3 Gosia Rdest Polish 23 50.924
5 95 Beitske Visser Dutch 22 50.935
6 21 Jessica Hawkins British 25 50.945
7 11 Vicky Piria Italian 28 51.024
8 7 Emma Kimilainen Finnish 23 51.144
9 85 Miki Koyama Japanese 23 51.500
10 37 Sabré Cook American 28 51.203
11 31 Tasmin Pepper South African 21 51.449
12 26 Sarah Moore British 26 51.489
13 20 Caitlin Wood Australian 26 51.500
14 67 Shea Holbrook American 22 51.516
15 2 Esmee Hawkey British 23 51.538
16 99 Naomi Schiff German 23 51.590
17 77 R Vivien Keszthelyi Hungary 25 51.654
18 27 Alice Powell British 6 55.067

Free Practice 2

Position No. Driver Nationality Laps Best Time
1 3 Gosia Rdest Polish 35 50.983
2 95 Beitske Visser Dutch 36 50.994
3 5 Fabienne Wohlwend Liechtenstein 39 51.073
4 21 Jessica Hawkins British 36 51.107
5 7 Emma Kimilainen Finnish 29 51.182
6 55 Jamie Chadwick British 40 51.198
7 77 R Vivien Keszthelyi Hungary 41 51.278
8 49 Megan Gilkes Canadian 34 51.294
9 19 Marta Garcia Spanish 37 51.362
10 27 Alice Powell British 35 51.396
11 58 R Sarah Bovy Belgian 39 51.431
12 31 Tasmin Pepper South African 20 51.495
13 67 Shea Holbrook American 38 51.701
14 26 Sarah Moore British 37 51.712
15 20 Caitlin Wood Australian 39 51.720
16 85 Miki Koyama Japanese 14 51.737
17 37 Sabré Cook American 28 51.794
18 11 Vicky Piria Italian 39 51.827
19 99 Naomi Schiff German 41 51.932

Free Practice 1

Position No. Driver Nationality Laps Best Time
1 5 Fabienne Wohlwend Liechtenstein 33 51.728
2 55 Jamie Chadwick British 28 51.857
3 37 Sabré Cook American 13 51.869
4 31 Tasmin Pepper South African 30 51.870
5 21 Jessica Hawkins British 29 51.960
6 95 Beitske Visser Dutch 32 51.961
7 3 Gosia Rdest Polish 31 51.981
8 7 Emma Kimilainen Finnish 26 52.026
9 26 Sarah Moore British 31 52.138
10 11 Vicky Piria Italian 28 52.146
11 27 Alice Powell British 25 52.237
12 2 Esmee Hawkey British 20 52.253
13 19 Marta Garcia Spanish 31 52.484
14 85 Miki Koyama Japanese 31 52.485
15 77 R Vivien Keszthelyi Hungary 20 52.520
16 58 R Sarah Bovy Belgian 29 52.694
17 49 Megan Gilkes Canadian 25 52.927
18 67 Shea Holbrook American 28 53.041
19 20 Caitlin Wood Australian 29 53.544
20 99 Naomi Schiff German 17 53.769

The Norisring has been an annual highlight of the German motor sport calendar since the first event was held in 1947. The temporary track is laid out on public roads in a southern suburb of the historic city of Nuremburg and features a layout that hasn’t changed in decades. A long bumpy pit straight is followed by heavy braking for a tight hairpin, which leads into a short sprint to a right/left chicane. Another long straight to a second hairpin before the track returns to the start/finish line.

From 1967 the headline event was a 200-mile sprint for sportscars, which always provided a huge contrast to the Le Mans 24 hours which preceded it on the calendar by a few weeks. In 1986 and 1987 it was even run as a round of the World Sportscar Championship. When the domestic sportscar scene faded in Germany the DTM – which had been run as a support race for several years – became the headline event from 1990 onwards.

The presence of European F3 on the DTM weekend schedule means that many current F1 drivers have sampled the track as they made their way up the ranks – including Max Verstappen, who was a winner in 2014.

The city location, huge crowds and good summer weather have helped to ensure that the Norisring has a place as the “Monaco” of the DTM calendar. Despite the simple layout the event typically produces dramatic races in all categories, with the first hairpin often the scene of overtaking manoeuvres and wheel-to-wheel action.